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-- an ongoing and generally unimportant record of personal grievances and shit i like

pix etc

(Source: parvxo, via aminaabramovic)

happy easter

happy easter

(Source: ancestor, via jockjams)

humansofnewyork:

"These experiences were so meaningful to me that I don’t want you to soundbite them."

humansofnewyork:

"These experiences were so meaningful to me that I don’t want you to soundbite them."

La folie Almayer (Chantal Akerman, 2011)

(Source: tracesofthevanished, via cesaire)

“Intimacy builds worlds; it creates spaces and usurps places meant for other kinds of relation. Its potential failure to stabilize closeness always haunts its persistent activity, making the very attachments deemed to buttress ‘a life’ seem in a state of constant if latent vulnerability. Even from this small cluster of examples and scenes it becomes clear that virtually no one knows how to do intimacy; that everyone feels expert about it (at least about other people’s disasters); and that mass fascination with the aggression, incoherence, vulnerability, and ambivalence at the scene of desire somehow escalates the demand for the traditional promise of intimate happiness to be fulfilled in everyone’s everyday life.” —Lauren Berlant, “Intimacy: A Special Issue” (1998)

(via aloofshahbanou)

darkmylight:

Woman of Fire - Kim Ki-Young, 1971.

(Source: arilou, via rivaldealer)

junot diaz on decolonial love

killingdenouement:

The Strand: You said in an interview with Paula M.L Moya for the Boston Review that you wrote Yunior as this character on a quest for “decolonial love”. Can you talk a bit about what “decolonial love” is? I’m interested in how you define it, what it means to you, how you came to the idea and how we can move through the world carrying it out. How do you embody decolonial love?

Diaz: It’s a supremely academic definition. Which doesn’t mean it’s not useful. I think for me one of the things that happens at the most molar level is that as colonial subjects, as people who continue to endure the weight, the history, the possession, the haunting of colonization and the long term effects of that — to actually value your own identity matrix over whiteness — is a revolution.

And for a male in a heteronormative relationship to try to discover the ways that his masculinity has been organized vis-à-vis women of colour, is part of this colonial enterprise too. And then the horror of it is that in situations of love we usually run away from people who put us in conversation with ourselves.

As a person of colour, [when you date a white person], first of all you get rewarded both inside and outside of the community. Second of all, it’s like an escape psychologically because you’re the one who always has authority around issues of identity. This person can’t speak back to you.

Third of all, you can no longer be reminded of yourself. If you date somebody from your own group — which this is not an argument that people who date outside of their group are terrors. I’m not saying that. But part of this process is the colonial process.

When you’re looking at someone from your own group, you’re suddenly confronted with yourself and history and colonization in ways that these other things don’t bring up.

Look, Yunior is an interesting guy because we encounter him dating a white girl. But Yunior is like, “This is not where I’m going.” And for a man of colour, that’s unheard of. What decolonial love is and how we pursue it is a conversation. And for me, my conversation engages some of these questions and practices.

The economy of love: an interview with Junot Díaz - CUP Newswire

(via latenightlaundromat)

jonasbrotherslover2k14:

Luis Borges for Brutus Magazine 

jonasbrotherslover2k14:

Luis Borges for Brutus Magazine 

(Source: baehaus, via tangerinatropical)

fuckyeahexistentialism:

Gabriel García Márquez   March 6, 1927- April 17, 2014

fuckyeahexistentialism:

Gabriel García Márquez   March 6, 1927- April 17, 2014

(Source: firsttimeuser, via tarkovskian)

Gabriel García Márquez, 1927 - 2014

nyrbclassics:

image

The Colombian novelist Alvaro Mutis used to tell a story about his close friend and compatriot Gabriel García Márquez, who has died aged 87. In the mid-Sixties, when the latter was writing One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967), they met every evening for a drink. García Márquez would tell Mutis about the scenes he’d written that day, and Mutis would listen, waiting avidly for the next installment. He started telling their friends that “Gabo” – as García Márquez was affectionately known – was writing a book in which a man called X did Y, and so on. When the novel was published, however, it bore no relation to the story García Márquez had told over tequila – not the characters or the plot or any aspect at all. Mutis was left with the feeling of having been brilliantly duped, and he mourned the unwritten novel of the bar, that ephemeral fiction no one else would ever hear.

—  from The Telegraph obituary for Gabriel García Márquez, featuring Márquez’s longtime friend, Alvaro Mutis, who died last year.

{Photo above, left to right: Gabriel García Márquez and Alvaro Mutis}

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